Tuesday, December 2, 2014

ROCK TRIVIA: TURQUOISE
The two oldest known turquoise mining areas are in Persia and in Egypt. There are six mines in the southwest coast of the Sinai Peninsula. and two of them are believed to be among the oldest known mines in the world.
Turquoise has been prized by civilizations around the world.The oldest known turquoise jewelry is a strand of beads from 5000 B.C.found in Iraq- then known as Mesopotamia. In ancient Egypt, Turquoise beads and jewelry date back to 4000 B.C. Engraved turquoise tablets with religeous passages were worn as amulets around 700 A.D.
The Incas carved beads, figurines and made astonishing inlay jewelry with turquoise, the Aztecs decorated ceremonial masks with it and the Indians of North America fashioned jewelry.
During the Middle Ages, Europeans decorated vessels and the covers of manuscripts with mosaics of small turquoise.Later, during the Renaissance, Turquoise was used in royal crowns and became one of the most popular gems to wear in Europe..

A fine Turquoise specimen from Los Cerrillos, New Mexico at the Smithsonian.

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: TURQUOISE
    The two oldest known turquoise mining areas are in Persia and in Egypt. There are six mines in the southwest coast of the Sinai Peninsula.  and two of them are believed to be among the oldest  known mines in the world. 
     Turquoise has been prized by civilizations around the world.The oldest known turquoise jewelry is a strand of beads from 5000 B.C.found in Iraq- then known as Mesopotamia. In ancient Egypt, Turquoise beads and jewelry date back to 4000 B.C.  Engraved turquoise tablets with religeous passages were worn as amulets around 700 A.D.
      The Incas carved beads, figurines and made astonishing inlay jewelry with turquoise, the Aztecs decorated ceremonial masks with it and the Indians of North America fashioned jewelry.
      During the Middle Ages, Europeans decorated vessels and the covers of manuscripts with mosaics of small turquoise.Later, during the Renaissance, Turquoise was used in  royal crowns and became one of the most popular gems to wear in Europe..
      
A fine Turquoise specimen from Los Cerrillos, New Mexico at the Smithsonian.

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