Wednesday, December 31, 2014

ROCK TRIVIA: LABRADORITE
Labradorite was named after Labrador in Canada, where it was found by Europeans in 1770. Eskimo legend has it that the Northern Lights were captured in the rocks along the coast of Labrador. It is said that a wandering Eskimo warrior found them and, although he managed to free most of the lights with his spear, some of the lights remained trapped within the stone.
Labradorite has a base color of mid to slate grey with metallic-looking color shimmers of blue, green, yellow, and red. This iridescent effect is called labradorescence- after the stone. This is caused by internal fractures that reflect light back and forth within the layers of the stone.
Labradorite is found in Canada, Australia, Madagascar, Mexico and the United States. Very fine varieties of Labradorite are found in Russia and Finland, and are called Spectrolite.

Pictured is a Labradorite specimen from the UCL Geology Collection.

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: LABRADORITE
     Labradorite was named after Labrador in Canada, where it was found by Europeans in 1770. Eskimo legend has it that the Northern Lights were captured in the rocks along the coast of Labrador. It is said that a wandering Eskimo warrior found them and, although he managed to free most of the lights with his spear, some of the lights remained trapped within the stone.
   Labradorite has a  base color of mid to slate grey with metallic-looking color shimmers of blue, green, yellow, and red. This iridescent effect is called labradorescence- after the stone. This is caused by internal fractures that reflect light back and forth within the layers of the stone.
Labradorite is  found in Canada, Australia, Madagascar, Mexico and the United States. Very fine varieties of Labradorite are found in Russia and Finland, and are called Spectrolite.

Pictured is a Labradorite specimen from the UCL Geology Collection.

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