Monday, July 14, 2014

ROCK TRIVIA: AMBER
Many trees produce resin, but the majority of deposits are broken down by exposure to sunlight, rain, and temperate extremes as well as bacteria and fungi. For resin to survive long enough to become amber, it has to be resistant to all this or be produced under conditions that exclude them. High pressures and temperatures produced by overlying sediment, transforms the resin first into copal. Sustained heat and pressure drive off organic compounds and results in the formation of amber.
Amber occurs in a range of different colors. As well as the usual yellow-orange-brown, amber can range from whitish through a pale lemon yellow, to brown and almost black. Other uncommon colors include red amber (sometimes known as "cherry amber"), green amber, and even blue amber, which is rare and highly sought after.
The most highly prized amber is transparent, rather than the common cloudy amber and opaque amber.
All Dominican amber is fluorescent, the rarest Dominican amber is blue amber. It turns blue in natural sunlight and any other even partially ultraviolet light..Only about 200 pounds is found a year, so it is very expensive.
Amber sometimes contains animals or plant matter that became caught in the resin as it was secreted. Insects, spiders and even their webs, bacteria and amoebae, marine microfossils, flowers and hair, feathers and other small organisms have been recovered in ambers dating to 130 million years ago.
In August 2012, two mites preserved in amber were determined to be the oldest animals ever to have been found in the substance; the mites are 230 million years old and were discovered in north-eastern Italy.

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: AMBER 
Many trees produce resin, but the majority of deposits are broken down by exposure to sunlight, rain, and temperate extremes as well as bacteria and fungi. For resin to survive long enough to become amber, it has to be resistant to all  this or be produced under conditions that exclude them. High pressures and temperatures produced by overlying sediment, transforms the resin first into copal. Sustained heat and pressure drive off organic compounds and results in the formation of amber.
Amber occurs in a range of different colors. As well as the usual yellow-orange-brown, amber can range from whitish through a pale lemon yellow, to brown and almost black. Other uncommon colors include red amber (sometimes known as "cherry amber"), green amber, and even blue amber, which is rare and highly sought after.
The most highly prized amber is transparent, rather than the common cloudy amber and opaque amber. 
 All Dominican amber is fluorescent, the rarest Dominican amber is blue amber. It turns blue in natural sunlight and any other even partially ultraviolet light..Only about 200 pounds is found a year, so it is very expensive.
Amber sometimes contains animals or plant matter that became caught in the resin as it was secreted. Insects, spiders and even their webs,  bacteria and amoebae,  marine microfossils, flowers and hair, feathers and other small organisms have been recovered in ambers dating to 130 million years ago.
In August 2012, two mites preserved in amber were determined to be the oldest animals ever to have been found in the substance; the mites are 230 million years old and were discovered in north-eastern Italy.

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