Thursday, December 18, 2014


2 new shipment of stone briolettes on my work table to be used today: Tibetan Turquoise, Arizona Turquoise, Garnet, Peach Moonstone, London Blue Topaz, Smoky Quartz, Black Spinel...
These on top of 130 finished pairs.Come see me this weekend for my best ever selection!
...
ROCK TRIVIA: GARNETS
Garnets are actually a group of more than ten different gemstones of similar chemical composition.A burgundy color is the most common, but garnets are also found in shades of green, yellow, orange and warm browns. There are even star garnets and color change garnets which look very different depending on whether they are seen in daylight or artificial light.
Garnets have been used and valued for thousands of years.The lantern Noah used to help him steer steer the ark is said to be made from Garnet. Garnets were used in jewelry by early Egyptians, Greeks and Romans.Garnets were popular as a talisman and protective stone, as it was believed to light up the night and protect its bearer from evil and disaster.
Pictured is an Antique Garnet Hairpin from the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: GARNETS
      Garnets are actually a group of more than ten different gemstones of similar chemical composition.A burgundy color is the most common, but  garnets are also found in shades of green, yellow,  orange and warm browns. There are even star garnets and color change garnets which look very different depending on whether they are seen in daylight or artificial light.
      Garnets have been used and valued for thousands of years.The lantern Noah used to help him steer steer the ark is said to be made from Garnet. Garnets were used in jewelry by early Egyptians, Greeks and Romans.Garnets were  popular as a talisman and protective stone, as it was believed to light up the night and protect its bearer from evil and disaster. 
      Pictured is an Antique Garnet Hairpin from the collection of the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History

Wednesday, December 17, 2014

Looks like the weather is going to clear and stay nice Saturday through Tuesday! Elementals will be at 
- Guero's Holiday Market Saturday from 11 to 8 and Sunday from 11 to 6
Gibson St. Artisans Market Monday and Tuesday from 11 to 5

Wednesday, December 10, 2014

ROCK TRIVIA: SMOKY QUARTZ
Smoky quartz is the national gem of Scotland. The Celts, who began colonizing the British Isles around 300 BC, mined the stone in the Scottish highlands. It is used in Scottish jewellery and as a decoration on kilt pins. The largest known crystal is a 52 pound specimen kept at Braemar Castle.
Here's an interesting fact: In 12th century China, flat panes of smoky quartz were used as sunglasses.
SMOKY QUARTZ AND FENG SHUI
In feng shui, smoky quartz is used as a protective measure, as well as to ground the energy. You can use carvings, a sphere, a geode or even tumbled stones.The energy of the smoky quartz works very well as a protective element close to the front door. A point or a cluster are best for this purpose. It is also excellent in a child's room or in your home office.
Pictured is an Art Deco pendant by Theodore Fahrner of Smokey Quartz with Marcasite in silver. About 1928

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: SMOKY QUARTZ
Smoky quartz is the national gem of Scotland. The Celts, who began colonizing the British Isles around 300 BC, mined the stone in the  Scottish highlands. It is used in Scottish jewellery and as a decoration on kilt pins. The largest known crystal is a 52 pound specimen kept at Braemar Castle.
Here's an interesting fact: In 12th century China, flat panes of smoky quartz were used as sunglasses. 
SMOKY QUARTZ AND FENG SHUI
In feng shui, smoky quartz is used as a protective measure, as well as to ground the energy. You can use carvings, a sphere, a geode or even tumbled stones.The energy of the smoky quartz works very well as a protective element close to the front door. A  point or a cluster are best for this purpose. It is also excellent in a child's room or in your home office.
Pictured is an Art Deco pendant by Theodore Fahrner of  Smokey Quartz with Marcasite in silver. About 1928

Friday, December 5, 2014

Elementals will be here along with 60 other local artisans, food trucks and music. Come have fun and pick up unique gifts made with care in your community!

Photo

Tuesday, December 2, 2014

ROCK TRIVIA: TURQUOISE
The two oldest known turquoise mining areas are in Persia and in Egypt. There are six mines in the southwest coast of the Sinai Peninsula. and two of them are believed to be among the oldest known mines in the world.
Turquoise has been prized by civilizations around the world.The oldest known turquoise jewelry is a strand of beads from 5000 B.C.found in Iraq- then known as Mesopotamia. In ancient Egypt, Turquoise beads and jewelry date back to 4000 B.C. Engraved turquoise tablets with religeous passages were worn as amulets around 700 A.D.
The Incas carved beads, figurines and made astonishing inlay jewelry with turquoise, the Aztecs decorated ceremonial masks with it and the Indians of North America fashioned jewelry.
During the Middle Ages, Europeans decorated vessels and the covers of manuscripts with mosaics of small turquoise.Later, during the Renaissance, Turquoise was used in royal crowns and became one of the most popular gems to wear in Europe..

A fine Turquoise specimen from Los Cerrillos, New Mexico at the Smithsonian.

Photo: ROCK TRIVIA: TURQUOISE
    The two oldest known turquoise mining areas are in Persia and in Egypt. There are six mines in the southwest coast of the Sinai Peninsula.  and two of them are believed to be among the oldest  known mines in the world. 
     Turquoise has been prized by civilizations around the world.The oldest known turquoise jewelry is a strand of beads from 5000 B.C.found in Iraq- then known as Mesopotamia. In ancient Egypt, Turquoise beads and jewelry date back to 4000 B.C.  Engraved turquoise tablets with religeous passages were worn as amulets around 700 A.D.
      The Incas carved beads, figurines and made astonishing inlay jewelry with turquoise, the Aztecs decorated ceremonial masks with it and the Indians of North America fashioned jewelry.
      During the Middle Ages, Europeans decorated vessels and the covers of manuscripts with mosaics of small turquoise.Later, during the Renaissance, Turquoise was used in  royal crowns and became one of the most popular gems to wear in Europe..
      
A fine Turquoise specimen from Los Cerrillos, New Mexico at the Smithsonian.

Monday, December 1, 2014

DECEMBER SPECIALS:
- Take 15% off all pieces with Amethyst, Garnet, Smoky quartz, Tiger Eye and Turquoise ( Turquoise is December's birthstone)
- Take 15% off purchases of three or more items